Thursday, December 29, 2016

Happy New Year from Linder Educational Coaching!

Good morning,

We wanted to take a quick minute to wish all of our clients a very Happy New Year! 2017 is only a few days away and we are excited for the new challenges and adventures that it will surely bring. Thank you for another great year of being able to help students succeed and reach their goals!


 

Monday, December 19, 2016

Why Executive Function Is A Vital Stepping-Stone For Kids’ Ability to Learn

Good morning,

Today we are sharing an important article from KQED News about how children learn and their ability to be able to learn.

"Neuroscientists and educational psychologists are constantly learning more about how children learn and the various influences beyond IQ that affect cognition.'

'At the same time, critics have pushed back against the notion that students underperform only because of cognitive deficits, pointing to an equally pressing need for big changes to teaching practice. Many teachers are trying to combine the research about cognitive skills with more effective teaching practices. They are finding that whether students are working on self-directed projects or worksheets, executive functioning skills are important."

At Linder Educational Coaching, we recognize how important executive functioning is for a child's ability to learn. Not only that but we specialize in helping children with ADD, ADHD, other LDs, behavioral issues and problems with executive functioning. If you are a parent and feel that your child needs help with their ability to learn and recognize certain influences that could be hindering that, please contact us! We are here to help your child succeed!

Visit: http://www.linderec.com/  or contact Kristin directly at: (703) 270-9129.

To continue reading the entire article from KQED News and learn more about what the researchers found visit the original article source at: https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2016/12/13/why-executive-function-is-a-vital-stepping-stone-for-kids-ability-to-learn/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=2044

Monday, December 12, 2016

Millions Have Dyslexia, Few Understand It

Millions Have Dyslexia, Few Understand It

"It's frustrating that you can't read the simplest word in the world."

'Thomas Lester grabs a book and opens to a random page. He points to a word: galloping.

"Goll—. G—. Gaa—. Gaa—. G—. " He keeps trying. It is as if the rest ­­of the word is in him somewhere, but he can't sound it out.'

"I don't ... I quit." He tosses the book and it skids along the table.'

'Despite stumbling over the simplest words, Thomas — a fourth-grader — is a bright kid. In fact, that's an often-misunderstood part of dyslexia: It's not about lacking comprehension, having a low IQ or being deprived of a good education.'

'Dyslexia is the most common learning disability in the United States. It touches the lives of millions of people, including me and Thomas." (To read the rest of the article, click here.

Does your child have Dyslexia or you think they may have Dyslexia? Does your child have some other auditory processing problem and struggles in school? If you answered 'yes' then we can help! We are a small firm in the Northern Virginia area that caters to students with ADD, ADHD, other LDs, behavioral issues and problems with executive functioning.

Contact us today at http://www.linderec.com/ or call Kristin directly at: (703) 270-9129.



Monday, December 5, 2016

How to Develop Mindsets for Compassion and Caring in Students

Good morning,

Today we are sharing an article from ww2.kqed.org about the mindsets of our children and how as teachers we can better empower them to have compassion. It all stems from the early experiences of Dr. Robert Brooks, who found himself in an unusual teaching setting.

"Early in his career Dr. Robert Brooks became the principal of a school in a locked-door unit at McLean Psychiatric Hospital. He and his staff of teachers worked with children and adolescents who were severely disturbed and whose behavior showed their turmoil. Within the first few months, Brooks felt demoralized and dreaded work each day.'

What I realized is when you feel you are losing control in a classroom, you become more controlling,” Brooks said. But as he and his staff tried to make their students do exactly as they said, they only behaved worse and learned less.'

What changed was a group of courageous educators who totally shifted their mindsets, and when they shifted their mindsets they shifted the practices they were using,” Brooks said."

‘Once you say a kid is unmotivated or doesn’t care, you’re already reflecting a mindset in which you’re blaming the child, whether you mean to or not.’

To view the original article, click here.

If you feel like your child is unmotivated or feel like you have hit a point of frustration that is beyond repair, we can help!

One of our main roles is to offer mediation between parents and students, as well as the students and school. We can help reduce the conflict in the home by taking over the management of a student. We will encourage them, hold them accountable, and also teach them how to advocate at school. This allows many families to get their relationships back with their children, and leave the worry and stress of school to us.

Be sure to contact us today at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/

Monday, November 28, 2016

Learning In The Age Of Digital Distraction

Good morning,

Today we are talking about something that all parents have to deal with in this day and age...smartphones and technology. Digital distraction is all around and sometimes it can distract our children from the task at hand.  What is this digital distraction's impact on productivity you may ask?

In a recent article from npr.org, entitled 'Learning In The Age Of Digital Distraction,' talks about a 'new book, The Distracted Mind: Ancient Brains in a High Tech World,' and how it 'explores the implications of, and brain science behind, this evolution (some might say devolution). It was written Adam Gazzaley, a neurologist and a professor at the University of California, San Francisco, and research psychologist Larry D. Rosen. To learn more about what the author of this book found and his conclusions, visit the original article link here.


If your student is struggling in school and you believe it's due to digital distractions, we can help! Whether it's one-on-one help or at our student-focused center, The Hub, Linder Educational Coaching can help get your child back on track. Don't wait! Contact Kristen today: e-mail Kristin@LinderEC.com or call Kristin directly at (703) 270-9129.


Monday, November 21, 2016

How College Friendships May Affect Student Success

Good Morning,

Today we want to share an article from npr.org entitled 'How College Friendships May Affect Student Success.' "Students are typically advised to avoid social distractions and keep their eyes on the academic prize instead.'
LA Johnson/NPR

'A new book from a researcher at Dartmouth College puts a new spin on that idea, mapping out the ways differently structured social networks affect students' experiences for good and for ill.

'Janice McCabe, an associate professor of sociology, interviewed a diverse group of 67 undergraduates at a large Midwestern public university (unnamed to protect student privacy.) She asked them to name their friends, which ranged from 3 to 60 individuals, and then she painstakingly mapped out the web of connections that made up each person's friend network.

'Her conclusion? "It's important to realize that friends can have academic as well as social benefits." And the type of network you have matters a lot."

It's important to know what types of peers and social groups your child is drawn to, as this article points out, can make a difference on their path to graduation.

To read the entire article and learn about the social friend group classifications Janice McCabe put students into, visit the original article here.

If you have an upcoming college freshman and want extra help in getting them set on the right path to graduation, contact us today at: http://www.linderec.com/



Monday, November 14, 2016

Teen Night Owls Struggle To Learn And Control Emotions At School

Good morning,

Today we are talking about an important topic every parent needs to be able to help manage, their teens sleep schedule. Npr.org recently featured an article that talks about just this and how locally, in Fairfax County, it affects our students. "Researchers surveyed 2,017 students in 19 schools in Fairfax County, Va., about a variety of factors related to sleep. They were in seventh to 12th grades.
The researchers wanted to know more about the associations between the amount of sleep students get, how sleepy they are in the daytime and a brain function known as self-regulation — the ability to control emotions, cognitive functions and behavior."

As a parent with a night owl teen you may already have a suspicion about the conclusions that the researchers found. But for those of you who don't have teenagers yet or think your child gets sufficient amounts of sleep, this may surprise you.

According to the article, "night owls tend to have the hardest time with self-regulation, the researchers found. These students have more memory problems, are more impulsive, and get irritated and frustrated more easily.'

'The researchers discovered that students who regularly go to bed late tend to be both sleepier during the day and have more trouble with self-regulation, regardless of how much sleep they actually report getting."

To read the entire article, please click here.


If your child is struggling academically or socially in school and you are looking for help, please contact us at: www.lindereducationalcoaching.com. We are here to help! 

Monday, November 7, 2016

My Daughter Has My Eyes, My Hair And My ADHD


"I was repulsed by math because it challenged me so much. I distracted myself with the subject matter around it, because I was interested in words and could connect with language. This interplay of exhaustion, panic, guilt and defeat is a frightful symphony. In my experience, this is the emotional soundtrack of ADHD." In the article entitled 'My daughter has my eyes, my hair and my ADHD' author Eileen Hoenigman Meyer talks about her own experience with ADHD and how she copes with her daughter's own ADHD diagnosis. "I thought there was a special language — a brightness — that the other children in my classes shared with the teachers. They were “in the know.” They got it. I struggled in a fog for reasons I could neither understand nor explain." (To continue reading the rest of this article from The Washington Post, click here.)

Do you have ADHD and can relate to Eileen's experiences? Does your child have ADHD and you are struggling to understand their perspective and how to help them? 

Here at Linder Educational Coaching we specialize in catering to students with ADD, ADHD, other LDs, behavioral issues and problems with executive functioning. We can help you and your child come up with a plan and skills to help them cope and learn to love living with their ADHD.

Contact us today at http://www.linderec.com/ or call Kristin directly at: (703) 270-9129. 





Monday, October 31, 2016

It's not too late! Check out The Hub for Your Child!

Do you have a scattered student? Are missing assignments and test scores an issue? Do projects get done last minute?

The Hub provides an after-school solution and a path to success for your student. Conveniently located next to Harrison Shopping CenterAR8559113 - View of the office from courtyard – a short walk from Williamsburg, Yorktown and Washington-Lee.


Why The Hub?
Distraction Free Environment
With cell phones and computers in class, and TV and Internet at home, very few students understand what it really means to focus and work efficiently. We provide a relaxed, coffee house-like environment where students can work free of buzzing phones and social media alerts. We admit only 10-15 students per day, so in our two-story space the environment is conducive to success. The Hub has both private and group work spaces, as well as one quiet floor and one floor where low talking and background music are allowed. The Hub provides an appropriate space for every preference.
Building independence
While we are here to help students coordinate their day and plan their work, The Hub encourages independent action. As we answer questions on subject matter, we push students to seek resolutions by helping them set up meetings with teachers or plan to visit review sessions in school or at The Hub.
Collaboration 
As any college graduate is aware, one of the best ways to focus is to surround yourself with others in a positive and supportive environment. We help students in the same classes coordinate to come at the same time, so that they can create study reviews together, compare notes, and quiz each other in preparation for exams.
AccountabilityStudents who want their parents “to quit nagging them”—but who continually struggle to complete work and prepare properly for exams—find The Hub a refreshing solution. We make sure they know what needs to be done and have a plan to tackle everything. Further, if parents wish, students can stay as long as needed to complete all work. This means family dinners can go back to being about family—and no more arguments and midnight homework sessions
Perfect for:
  • Supplemental coaching
  • Students who don’t need full private assistance
  • Students transitioning out of private coaching
  • Students with shifting sports schedules
  • Weeks overrun with exams & projects
  • Parents who work late and want to be sure their child has done everything needed before they get home
 For more information, references, or to reserve your spot, email Kristin@LinderEC.com

Monday, October 24, 2016

How Writing Novels Expands Students’ Expectations of Themselves

Today we are sharing an article from https://ww2.kqed.org entitled 'How Writing Novels Expands Students’ Expectations of Themselves' in which English teacher Laura Bradley teaches her students how to write a novel every year as part of the curriculum for her middle school students. "In preparation, students identify their novel’s genre, create characters, craft conflicts and outline the plot. Students are free to choose their topics and develop their main characters."


By doing this, Laura Bradley is able to allow her students to hold themselves to higher standards and accomplish the unexpected, in turn boosting their self-esteem and creative sides. Here at Linder Educational Coaching we also work with your child to help them develop greater expectations for themselves and the kind of work they can do. Whether it's improving test scores or learning accountability, we can help your child!

Contact us today at  http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/





Monday, October 17, 2016

'The Myth of the Straight A Student' and Teaching Our Kids to Have Balanced Lives

Good morning,

Today we are sharing an article from The Washington Post about the pressures of today's students to be "straight A students" and get into the top colleges.

"Everyone is not getting straight As. Even those who do won’t necessarily end up at Harvard; there are too many other factors. As the college admissions process has grown more competitive, parents have become increasingly concerned about academic performance. More parents are pushing for higher grades when their children earn less than a B. But grades are subjective, and they can be deceptive. Teachers may inflate grades. A student who takes an easy course load may do better than a student taking all advanced classes. Some teachers may be exceptionally harsh graders. Even between schools, there can be major differences in standards and how students are assessed. Grades also may be weighted to account for course rigor. By acknowledging these inconsistencies and limitations, we can help kids focus on more important goals, such as accruing knowledge, determining strengths and interests, and developing a love of learning. As Alexandra Robbins illustrates in “Overachievers: The Secret Life of Driven Kids,” a book about the pressured daily lives of eight Whitman students, you don’t need a perfect GPA to be successful."

However it's important for parents and students to realize that there are many opportunities out there and being well-rounded, giving back and searching for a more balanced life can also, and in many cases lead to just as much lifelong success.

"There are thousands of colleges in the United States. When parents and students peruse the list of schools their local high school’s graduates actually attend, it expands their awareness beyond name-brand institutions. The tide also may be turning when it comes to college admissions. Richard Weissbourd, a child and family psychologist on the faculty at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, issued a report that calls on colleges to change their admissions criteria to emphasize caring for others and meaningful ethical engagement over laundry lists of accomplishments. More than 50 admission deans have endorsed his report, including the entire Ivy League. Schools still want to see academic rigor, but not at the expense of students leading balanced lives."

Here at Linder Educational Coaching, we encourage our students to work to find that balance- where they can succeed in school but also expand their awareness beyond just the grade letter. We work with students to not only help them pass the test, but to learn skills which they can carry forward into their adult lives to be successful. If you want to work with professionals to help your student gain more balance in their lives while maintaining good grades, call us today or visit us online at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/



Monday, October 10, 2016

7 ways to promote positive reading habits for older children

"Research consistently shows that extensive reading increases vocabulary and broadens knowledge and understanding of various topics. Most middle and high school students who would greatly benefit from reading more do not have the luxury of time to enjoy reading for pleasure.

As children grow older and their schedules increasingly fill with activities associated with school, sports and social endeavors, finding the time and opportunity to read can become a challenge. Like many parents, I occasionally mourn the time when bedtime routines included reading books aloud while snuggling. I long for the days when the homework was to read for 30 minutes and keep a reading log.

As a parent and an educator I want to instill a love of reading in children. I intentionally model positive reading habits and provide time and opportunities for my older children to read. However, I do not want to make reading yet another requirement, just one more item for my children to cross off their already overflowing to-do lists. Here is how I encourage my older children to read for enjoyment."

To learn more about 7 ways to promote positive reading in your child, visit the full article here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/parenting/wp/2016/08/24/7-ways-to-promote-positive-reading-habits-for-older-children/

Are you looking for ways to help your child read? Do you see a lot of potential for them but can't quite breakthrough to them the importance of reading? If so, fear not, Linder can help! We are a a small firm in the Northern Virginia area that caters to students with ADD, ADHD, other LDs, behavioral issues and problems with executive functioning. We work with students of all ages to help them read, comprehend and more! Contact us today at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/ for more information!

Monday, October 3, 2016

Can we help our children be motivated to succeed?

"Humans are motivated by many factors: reward, internal satisfaction, competition, praise, fear. Developmentally, your daughter is not “little” anymore. The days of lollipops and trinkets as motivators are largely over, and she is in a stage in which her internal voice is becoming stronger. Her likes and dislikes, her temperament, her passions will begin to take focus more clearly."
Does this mean she’s lazy, afraid of work or destined to be second-rate when the going gets tough?
No.

When a child feels that the stakes are emotionally high (“If I quit this, Mom will feel disappointed in me”) and that the cost could be her relationship with you, the child will pull away from hard things to avoid the pain of this separation. This is not conscious. I repeat: This is not conscious. This is an emotion that springs from her because all children want to feel close to their parents, and when that is threatened, the reptilian brain jumps in and says, “Whoa! Back away from that piano/homework/video game! You will fail, and Mom will look at you with those sad eyes.” It sounds ridiculous, but even the perception of separation can cause a child to back away from something fearful."- Meghan Leahy for the Washington Post



Here at Linder Educational Coaching we see students of all ages who struggle with motivation for their schoolwork and in life. It's one of the many things we can help your child with! We work with students to help them develop the skills needed to find what motivates them and help bring out their willingness to learn. If you feel that your child is lacking motivation for their studies and could use a helping hand, contact us today at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/



Monday, September 26, 2016

Back-to-School Homework Tips

Good morning,

Many schools have been in session for a few weeks now, and you may have noticed your child struggling to focus and complete their homework in a timely manner. If  this is the case, we are here to help! We are a small firm in the Northern Virginia area that caters to students with ADD, ADHD, other LDs, behavioral issues and problems with executive functioning. We work with students of all ages and levels to help them succeed not only in their academic endeavors, but with life skills as well.
To get help for your child or learn more, please visit our website:  http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/



If you are looking for some advice right away, take a peek at this video shared from WJLA.com on 'Back-to-School Homework Tips.'

Click here for the vido:
http://wjla.com/news/lets-talk/back-to-school-homework-tips

Monday, September 19, 2016

What Babies Know About Physics and Foreign Languages

Today we are highlighting an article from The New York Times entitled 'What Babies Know About Physics and Foreign Languages.' This article isn't about what you would expect, but instead highlights how today's culture has demanded that children learn more and more at a young age. Keep reading below for more and find out how Linder can help your child learn in and out of the classroom!

"Parents and policy makers have become obsessed with getting young children to learn more, faster. But the picture of early learning that drives them is exactly the opposite of the one that emerges from developmental science. In the last 30 years, the United States has completed its transformation to an information economy. Knowledge is as important in the 21st century as capital was in the 19th, or land in the 18th. In the same 30 years, scientists have discovered that even very young children learn more than we once thought possible. Put those together and our preoccupation with making children learn is no surprise.

The trouble is that most people think learning is the sort of thing we do in school, and that parents should act like teachers — they should direct special lessons at children to produce particular kinds of knowledge or skill, with the help of how-to books and “parenting” apps. Studies prove that high-quality preschool helps children thrive. But policy makers and educators are still under pressure to justify their investments in early childhood education. They’ve reacted by replacing pretend corners and playground time with “school readiness” tests.

But in fact, schools are a very recent invention. Young children were learning thousands of years before we had ever even thought of schools."

At Linder Educational Coaching, we recognize that not all learning happens in a classroom or with prepared tests. We work with each child to bring out their natural learning abilities and help them succeed in a variety of methods.   Contact us today to learn more about how we can help your child at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/


Monday, September 12, 2016

Listening Isn’t Cheating: How Audio Books Can Help Us Learn

Today we want to talk about a sometimes controversial topic, audio learning. There is a perception among some educators and parents that listening to audio books defies the point and is a form of "cheating."  In this article from KQEd.org, "professor Daniel Willingham, author of 'Raising Kids Who Read,' explains the difference in how the brain processes listening vs. reading" and why audio books aren't all that bad.

"Listening to an audio book might be considered cheating if the act of decoding were the point; audio books allow you to seem to have decoded without doing so. But if appreciating the language and the story is the point, it’s not.   Comparing audio books to cheating is like meeting a friend at Disneyland and saying 'you took a bus here? I drove myself, you big cheater.' The point is getting to and enjoying the destination. The point is not how you traveled."


At Linder Educational Coaching, we employ a variety of methods to help each child learn and succeed, including audio learning.We have students listen to audio books WHILE reading to learn pacing, help focus, and increase understanding especially for auditory learners.

Each person learns differently and needs to find a way to use his/her natural abilities in school. Our goal is to help bring out those natural abilities in every student. Each family calls us for a different reason, and we are very sensitive to the needs of each client. Some families want to make sure their child is prepared for the next grade, others call because their child has become detached from school and is doing poorly in multiple classes. We work with many students on specific areas that are weaker for them, whether it is language arts or math and sciences.

Contact us today to set up an appointment for your child! http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/




Monday, August 22, 2016

The Role of Metacognition in Learning and Achievement

Good morning,

Today we are talking about metacognition and why it's important for our children. What is metacognition? "Metacognition, simply put, is the process of thinking about thinking. It is important in every aspect of school and life, since it involves self-reflection on one’s current position, future goals, potential actions and strategies, and results. At its core, it is a basic survival strategy, and has been shown to be present even in rats."

Metacognition "can improve the application of knowledge, skills, and character qualities in realms beyond the immediate context in which they were learned." In turn this can help your student process information and skills learned in the classroom across other areas of study and life. "Transfer can also be necessary within a discipline, such as when a particular idea or skill was learned with one example, but students must know how to apply it to another task to complete their homework or exams, or to a different context. Transfer is the ultimate goal of all education, as students are expected to internalize what they learn in school and apply it to life."

To view the entire article click here. 


Here at Linder Educational Coaching, we understand the importance of metacognition and will work with your child to teach the skills needed to be successful in academics, from organization and study skills to memory techniques and test taking strategies.

If you want your child to get ahead and start this academic school year on the right track, contact us today! http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/



Back to school: How to advocate for your child without being ‘that’ parent

Good morning,

With many school districts around the metro area starting this week and next, we wanted to share this great article from The Washington Post entitled 'Back to school: How to advocate for your child without being ‘that’ parent.'

As we all know, "the beginning of the school year brings with it all sorts of feelings for parents. Watching those little people (even if they are taller than you now) head off to their first day of school, shiny backpack at the ready, is not an easy time to let go. If you’re like most parents, you’re wondering what actually happens inside those walls during the day. Maybe you want to talk to the teacher about your son’s propensity to forget his math facts, your daughter’s inability to focus on tests, your child’s issues with a former friend. But how does a parent let go and stay connected at the same time? How does a parent effectively communicate with that teacher who holds so much power, whose influence will form your child’s feelings about school, about learning, about the future?"


  • Ask about the teacher’s communication style
  • Remember, teachers actually want to hear from you
  • Keep yourself in check, and know that teachers can help you with this


If you want to read more in-depth detail about each of these bullet points the article makes, please click here.  If you are looking for help getting your students on the right track, or want professional advice on how best to work with teachers and meet your child's needs, we are here to help! 

For example, your child may be best suited in our private coaching program. As you know, very rarely do teachers in school have the time or ability to focus on one student and understand the struggles and problems with that student’s learning method. Each person learns differently and needs to find a way to use his/her natural abilities in school.


With private coaching we work with students intensively, at least a few hours a week at first, to analyze what their current strategies are and how we can improve on them. 



Monday, August 15, 2016

The Best Schools In The World Do This. Why Don't We?

Good morning,

Today we are sharing an article from npr.org entitled 'The Best Schools In The World Do This. Why Don't We?'  This article reveals three of the biggest takeaways from a report which studied some of the world's top-performing school systems, including those in Finland, Hong Kong, Japan, Ontario, Poland, Shanghai, Singapore and Taiwan. The three biggest findings were as follows:

1. More Help For The Youngest Learners
2. Teachers Need To Be Better
3. Fix Career And Technical Education (CTE) programs


At Linder Educational Coaching, we work to assist your child in a variety of comprehensive methods to help them succeed in school. Each family calls us for a different reason, and we are very sensitive to the needs of each client. Some families want to make sure their child is prepared for the next grade, others call because their child has become detached from school and is doing poorly in multiple classes. We work with many students on specific areas that are weaker for them, whether it is language arts or math and sciences.

As individuals, those at Linder Educational Coaching have a collection of very different backgrounds individually with school and learning. As a group, we provide a wealth of knowledge, experiences, and ideas to every client. We love our job and the challenges and rewards it brings, and appreciate all our current and future clients for trusting us with their children.

If you are looking for help with your child, contact us today at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/

If you want to read the entire article to learn more about their findings, visit: http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/08/09/488214332/the-best-schools-in-the-world-do-this-why-dont-we?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20160809

Monday, August 8, 2016

The most common high school struggles and how we can help!

With summer nearing the end and many students about to begin their high school journeys, we wanted to talk about some of the most common struggles students can experience during high school. In an article published by The Study Gurus, students from all over the nation wrote in about issues which they feel are the most challenging. According to the article the vast majority of questions had something to do with motivation, which isn't surprising. The other most common issues are:

  • Motivation
  • Stress
  • Time Management 
Here are Linder Education, not only are we experienced in helping students learn to cope with these issues but we have many success stories from students just like yours. One of the reasons for this is that we provide a comprehensive answer to families with students. We provide three main areas of service: private coaching, an after school program called The Hub, and workshops. In all of these areas we focus on organization, planning for the week and month, study skills, test-taking skills, subject comprehension, and independence. For many families, this is a welcome answer to the stress school has brought into the home. 

Our coaches talk with teachers to make sure our methods are effective and to gain an understanding of each child in and out of the classroom. We work closely with the parents to structure a study system that works in their home and with their family schedule. Every week, we work to assure all homework is done, tests are prepared for, and material is understood.

To learn more about how we can help your child visit: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/

Monday, August 1, 2016

6 Tips to Fight Distractions and Get Homework Done

Good afternoon,

Staying within the realm of last week's blog post today we are sharing an article from http://www.additudemag.com/ entitled '6 Tips to Fight Distractions and Get Homework Done. From fidgeting to shifting between different tasks, six techniques to help distracted ADD/ADHD students focus at school and on their homework.'

As you may or may not know, here at Linder Educational Coaching we cater to students with ADD, ADHD, other LDs, behavioral issues and problems with executive functioning. Fighting distraction and getting work done, or accomplishing smarter study habits can be difficult for any child. This article talks about a few of the suggestions to keep your student on pace and able to finish their homework.

If you are looking for help for your child, especially if they have ADD/ADHD and you don't know where to start, contact us today! We are here to help!
http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/

6 Tips to Fight Distractions and Get Homework Done!


"Having two children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), I tried a lot of traditional study methods through the years, with no success. Such techniques — usually involving sitting down at a table for extended periods with pen, paper, study guides, and textbook — do not accommodate the way that ADHD brains work.

My son, Josh, has severe ADHD and poor working memory. His standardized test scores didn’t reflect his high IQ, because he rarely finished a test in the time allotted. The scratching of students’ pencils and whispers from those who had already finished drew his attention away from his work. We brainstormed ways to shut out the noise and keep him on task. When he wore foam earplugs to block out background noise and used a visual timer to pace himself, he finished every test."

To continue reading the original article, click here. 

Monday, July 25, 2016

Studying Smart, Not Hard

Good morning,

Here at Linder Educational Coaching we work with students of all ages to promote good study behaviors and habits of 'studying smarter, not harder.' This article from planetofsuccess.com sheds some light into the practices of simplification to get the most of study sessions.

If your child works hard and studies frequently but still falls short of the desired grades, there are ways we can help work with your child to improve their study habits. Visit us online at http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/programs/ to learn more about the services we offer!


BY STEVE MUELLER for planetofsuccess.com 


Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Is It Time To Ban Computers From Classrooms?

Continuing with a similar theme from last week's blog, today we are again talking about the hotly-debated topic: technology in classrooms. This isn't something that is just happening at select institutions either. Even in our own Arlington, Virginia school district with school-supplied laptops and iPads, people are talking. Having technology in the classrooms can be especially difficult for ADD/ADHD students who struggle in managing the temptations and distractions they come with. We are sharing an article from npr.org, entitled ' Is It Time To Ban Computers From Classrooms?'



"Students in either of the conditions that allowed devices performed significantly worse, on average, than their peers in the condition that banned devices. This effect held up even when the researchers controlled for other factors that could potentially affect student performance, such as composite ACT score and baseline GPA. The two conditions that did allow computers — unrestricted or face-up tablet — did not differ from each other."

Take a look for yourself and see if you agree that it's time to ban technology in the classrooms bu visitinghttp://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2016/07/11/485490818/is-it-time-to-ban-computers-from-classrooms?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20160711

If you or a friend has a child in need of help in the classroom, we have a variety of options and programs to choose from! Visit http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/ and contact Kristin today for your consultation!

Monday, July 11, 2016

Attention, Students: Put Your Laptops Away!

Good morning,

With so many of our students preparing for their senior year and some beginning their first semester of college very soon we wanted to share this great article from NPR.org entitled 'Attention, Students: Put Your Laptops Away.'  This article sheds light onto the fact that taking notes by hand still has its benefits and can help students remember material better for exams, especially in big lecture halls.


"As laptops become smaller and more ubiquitous, and with the advent of tablets, the idea of taking notes by hand just seems old-fashioned to many students today. Typing your notes is faster — which comes in handy when there's a lot of information to take down. But it turns out there are still advantages to doing things the old-fashioned way.

For one thing, research shows that laptops and tablets have a tendency to be distracting — it's so easy to click over to Facebook in that dull lecture. And a study has shown that the fact that you have to be slower when you take notes by hand is what makes it more useful in the long run.

When people type their notes, they have this tendency to try to take verbatim notes and write down as much of the lecture as they can," Mueller tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "The students who were taking longhand notes in our studies were forced to be more selective — because you can't write as fast as you can type. And that extra processing of the material that they were doing benefited them."

If your student has trouble taking notes or seems to fall short and misjudge key information from class, we can help! Each family calls us for a different reason, and we are very sensitive to the needs of each client. Some families want to make sure their child is prepared for the next grade, others call because their child has become detached from school and is doing poorly in multiple classes.  Good note taking isn't something that comes naturally for all students and we understand that. We can help your child improve their note-taking skills and transfer that information into good study habits.

Call us today or visit online at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/!

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

19 Years Later: Social Success Just As Important

"Every parent wants to see their kid get good grades in school. But now we know social success is just as important."

Today we are sharing an article from upworthy.com on the findings of a few researchers who studied kindergarteners' behavior and then followed up nineteen years later. "A new study shows that when children learn to interact effectively with their peers and control their emotions, it can have an enormous impact on how their adult lives take shape. And according to the study, kids should be spending more time on these skills in school."

Here at Linder Educational Coaching we work with students not only on an academic level but we also cater to students with ADD, ADHD, other LDs and behavioral issues. Just like this article confirms we know the importance of a well-rounded approach to your child's success in school. We do more than just teach kids information and how to work through assignments. With the help of parents and others we know that investing time into teaching them how to relate to others and how to handle the things they're feeling inside can only help them improve on their overall academic path.

To learn more about Linder please visit our website at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/

To read the original article and it's conclusions visit: http://www.upworthy.com/researchers-studied-kindergarteners-behavior-and-followed-up-19-years-later-here-are-the-findings?c=ufb6

Monday, June 27, 2016

ACT/SAT Prep Class-Success Story!

Good morning,

In case you hadn't heard yet...we are thrilled to say that one of our students for the June 10 ACT improved from a 23 (68th percentile) to a 33 (>99th percentile)! He took one of our prep classes, and we have three more organized for the September test date. If your student needs great test prep and wants to get the college standardized test DONE in order to focus on grades next year, let us know!



Monday, June 20, 2016

192 Questions for Writing or Discussion This Summer

Good afternoon,

Today we are sharing an article from the New York Times which encompasses 192 different questions students (13 years or older) can use them to practice writing persuasively or creatively this summer. So if you are looking for something extra to help your student at home this summer with their writing, try one of these questions!

In addition to at-home practice, we are also offering summer writing academic workshops.
The Essay is a small group workshop which is 20 hours total.

We are also having a Creative Writing small group workshop which is 12 hours total.

If you think that either of these writing workshops sounds like something you want your child to do, you can contact us or find more at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/writing-workshop/

Monday, June 13, 2016

How Teens Benefit From Reading About the Struggles of Scientists

Good morning,

Today we are sharing an article from http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift  entitled 'How Teens Benefit From Reading About the Struggles of Scientists.'  We often see teens come in who are struggling with science and are looking for not only guidance, but an underlying sense of motivation that they can succeed as well. This is not an uncommon idea for junior high and high school students today.

"What kind of people can become scientists?  When a group of researchers posed that question to ninth- and 10th-graders, almost every student gave empowering responses, such as “People who work hard” or “Anyone who seems interested in the field of science.”

But despite these generalized beliefs, many of these same students struggled to imagine themselves as scientists, citing concerns such as “I’m not good at science” and “Even if I work hard, I will not do well.”

It’s understandable that students might find imagining themselves as scientists a stretch — great achievements in science get far more attention than the failed experiments, so it’s easy to see a scientist’s work as stemming from an innate talent. Additionally, several science fields have a long way to go to be more inclusive of women and underrepresented minorities.  

But for high school students, learning more about some of the personal and intellectual struggles of scientists can help students feel more motivated to learn science. Researchers at Teachers College, Columbia University and the University of Washington designed an intervention to “confront students’ beliefs that scientific achievement reflects ability rather than effort by exposing students to stories of how accomplished scientists struggled and overcame challenges in their scientific endeavors.”

To continue reading this article and find out what helped these students better relate to science, click: http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2016/05/10/how-teens-benefit-from-reading-about-the-struggles-of-scientists/

If your child is struggling with science, math or another subject and needs help, please contact us today! We have individual and group sessions to help get your child confidently learning and back on track. Visit our Linder Educational Coaching website here: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/


Monday, June 6, 2016

Did You Know? Offering Math Workshops this summer!

Good afternoon!

Did you know that we are offering group math workshops this summer here at Linder Educational Coaching? We will have 4-7 slots available per session and each session will be nine hours total.

Our math prep courses will do two things: review the most relevant skills in the prior math class, and preview the material coming in the first quarter of the new math class. So many students struggle with math in the first quarter due to a summer off and trying to get settled into the school year, so these classes provide a great way for students to start strong and achieve their goals first quarter.

We will set the schedule upon interest so be sure to email Kristin today if interested at: Kristin@LinderEC.com

To learn more about Linder, visit: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Did you know? Offering Private College Essay Workshops This Summer!

Here at Linder Educational Coaching we are offering a private workshop with Kristin Carpenter. The workshop is 10 hours total and has flexible scheduling.

During the workshop your student will have completion of common core essays, as well as at least one additional school specific essay.

The dreaded college essay can overwhelm students (and parents!). While there are many “how-to” guides and sets of “rules,” we feel that a great essay leaves the admissions officers with a strong sense of who the student is as a person. Only then can they decide if this person is the right match for the school. We consider college essays to be a personal strength, and have many references upon request. By crafting strong essays that highlight a student’s character, we have had many students gain acceptance into universities with requirements that were above their SAT/ACT scores and GPA. Further, we have had many students gain scholarship money through submission of elective essays. Feel free to contact Kristin to discuss if we are the right match to help your child and family in this process!  Visit www.lindereducationalcoaching.com to learn more!

We only have 4 slots available for the coming school year so don't wait to sign up! 



Monday, May 23, 2016

Don't Wait! Restore Your Relationship With Your Child Today!

Good morning,

Are you tired of fighting over school with your child? Did you know that one of our main roles here at Linder Educational Coaching is to offer mediation between parents and students, as well as the students and school.
We can help reduce the conflict in the home by taking over the management of a student. We will encourage them, hold them accountable, and also teach them how to advocate at school. This allows many families to get their relationships back with their children, and leave the worry and stress of
school to us.
Don't wait until it's too late to get help and get your child on the right track for the following school year! Contact us today at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/


Monday, May 16, 2016

Talking About Failure: What Parents Can Do to Motivate Kids in School

Good morning,

Today we are sharing an article from http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift entitled 'Talking About Failure: What Parents Can Do to Motivate Kids in School.' We often speak with parents who seem frustrated and don't know what else they can do to help their children succeed in school. Helping parents work through these obstacles and find ways to motivate their children is just one small part of the process here at Linder Educational Coaching.
To learn more about how we can help you and your child visit:  http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/

"Is failure a positive opportunity to learn and grow, or is it a negative experience that hinders success? How parents answer that question has a big influence on how much children think they can improve their intelligence through hard work, a study says."

To read the article and find out some ways parents can help motivate their children in school click here: http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2016/05/08/talking-about-failure-what-parents-can-do-to-motivate-kids-in-school/


Monday, May 9, 2016

Comparing the New SAT to the ACT (And How Linder Can Help!)

Good morning,

As many of you may or may not know, the new SAT test was launched in March of this year. We often get a lot of questions on the new test format, how it compares to the old SAT and the current ACT test. Here at Linder Educational Coaching we offer many SAT/ACT test prep options for your child. If you are not sure which test your child should take? We can also help you navigate through the process and make the best decision for your child! To help make things a little easier we are sharing a basic comparison chart. Take a look below and contact us today at http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/  to discuss a plan of action for your child!



Compare the New SAT to the ACT
Taking the SAT is the best way to show colleges you have the skills and knowledge they want most. Find out how the new SAT, launched in March, compares to the ACT.*

Monday, May 2, 2016

Did You Know? Offering SAT/ACT Test Prep for students!

Not sure which test is right for your child? Feel free to call us or contact us through our website, http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/  to discuss the pros and cons of each exam!
We are here to help your child be prepared!

 2015-2016 Student Success Stories so far:

  • Over 75% of the students we prepped scored in the top 10% of all testers nationwide (composite of 28+)
  • Over 60% of the students we prepped scored in the top 3% nationwide (composite 31+)
  • Biggest composite score increase: 24 to a 33 (74th to 99th percentile)
  • Best overall composite: 35

 2014-2015 Student Success Stories:

  • Best single score increase: An ACT increase from 16 to 29 on the math portion with two hours of tutoring (an increase from the 23rd to the 97th percentile)
  • Biggest composite score increase: An ACT increase from a 22 to a 30 (from 62nd to 95th percentile)
  • Highest composite score of the year: Composite of 33 on the ACT (over the 99th percentile) after 9 hours of tutoring (began with a 28 -90th percentile)
  • We had 4 students score a perfect 36 on at least one section of the ACT

More about our Private ACT/SAT Workshops:

  • 15 hours of private instruction
  • Hours divided according to student’s needs and goals
  • All materials provided
  • 4 spots available per test date
  • Our private ACT/SAT workshop totals 15 hours of personal tutoring. We create a custom schedule for each student, planning more time to focus on areas of weak performance. Sessions are twice weekly, with study materials and assignments to be completed in between. We cover more than just the subject material, including test-taking strategies, study techniques, and time management through the test. In this manner, we bring our skills of educational coaching to the SAT/ACT, creating students that not only know the material, but also how to prepare for and perform well on a standardized exam.


• Works best for students: that have moderate to severe learning disabilities, are aiming for the top percentiles, or are unable to meet during a consistent class schedule.

More about out Group ACT Workshops:

  • 18 hours of small group instruction with Kristin Carpenter
  • All materials provided
  • Includes two fully proctored 4 hour exams outside of the counted session hours
  • 3-6 spots available per test date
  • Our small group ACT workshop totals 18 hours of instruction. Sessions are twice weekly, with study materials and assignments to be completed in between. We cover more than just the subject material, including test-taking strategies, study techniques, and time management through the test.
• Works best for students: that need to review all sections of the exam thoroughly, enjoy working with peers in a group setting, need monitored and proctored practice tests to stay on track, and can attend a regular class schedule in the summer leading up to the test.


Monday, April 25, 2016

Registration is NOW OPEN for Summer Workshops!

Hello Parents,

Registration is now open for our summer workshops!

Next school year will be here before you know it, and the summer is an ideal time to make sure students are prepared for the demands of the coming grade. We have listened to your requests and
considered the areas that we feel most often hold students back from achieving their potential. Consequently, we have created the following workshops to address skill sets that are vital to success in school, but all too often cannot be addressed with the demands of assignments during the year. Not every student needs every workshop, but almost every student would benefit incredibly from
one of the workshops. Feel free to call Kristin to discuss your child, his or her needs, and if our workshops are the right fit. We want to help our students be successful.

Our most common workshop recommendations:

  • Rising 9th graders: Study Skills Workshop
  • Rising 10th graders: AP Prep or The Essay
  • Rising 11th graders: ACT/SAT prep
  • Rising 12th graders: College Essay Workshop / Admissions Support

We will also be offering:

  • The Hub for summer school (taking reservations already)
  • Subject support (especially needed for students that struggle in foreign language or math, or that need concerted reading/writing work)
  • Enrichment (short prep for upcoming math levels, foreign language refreshers before school, or scholarship/essay work)

If you would like to schedule a time to discuss your student and what support, if any, is the right fit, please contact Kristin by e-mail at Kristin@LinderEC.com or call Kristin directly at (703) 270-9133.





Monday, April 18, 2016

How to Get Past Negativity Bias in Order to Hardwire Positive Experiences

Good morning!

Today we are sharing an article from http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift entitled 'How to Get Past Negativity Bias in Order to Hardwire Positive Experiences.' Here at Linder Educational Coaching we see all types of mental road blocks with our students, which we work with them to help them overcome. Everyone learns differently but many of us are hardwired to "look for the negative" therefore inhibiting growth and learning. Through our specialized educational coaching we can help students see the positive in their learning and excel in school. If you are looking for individualized help for your student, please contact us at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/

How to Get Past Negativity Bias in Order to Hardwire Positive Experiences
By Katrina Schwartz

"Any kind of mental activity, including experiences, entails underlying neural activity,” said Rick Hanson, a psychologist and senior fellow at the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, at a Learning & the Brain conference. He has developed practices to help people build up their mental capacity for happiness by creating patterns of neural activity that with time and repetition become neural pathways.'

'Hanson calls this process “self-directed neuroplasticity.” To grow inner strength, people have to turn experiences (short-term memories) into activated states that are installed traits (long-term and implicit memories). The idea is to turn fleeting moments of happiness into implicit knowledge of well-being and strength.'

'Helping children develop self-directed neuroplasticity could be extremely helpful for students with trouble sitting still or who have learning challenges, but it could also be explicitly tied to academic outcomes. Hanson’s strategies could help students develop motivation and a sense of themselves as active learners. It’s a way of helping students to see life as an opportunity and for noting the positive in themselves and others. And, at a fundamental level, it’s a way of taking the time to hardwire and register curricular learning."

Monday, April 11, 2016

Want your child to get into college and have a good life? Here’s how.

Good morning,

Today we are sharing an article from The Washington Post which sheds some insight on the crushing expectations for most high school students in today's society when it comes into getting into college. The article mentions a report which calls for change that needs to happen with teachers and parents alike, in order to allow students to explore deeper commitments and meanings to their communities, not just adding activity after activity to fill up their resume.

"To be clear, none of the recommendations in the report are new values for colleges admissions. Even the most elite schools have always favored depth over breadth and quality over quantity, whether in courses or extracurricular activities. They have always appreciated demonstrations of kindness and empathy and deeper, sustained commitments to service have always held more weight in admissions than one-off stints or expensive missionary trips. This is not actually news. What is news is that colleges are saying it loud and clear through this report, trying to convey to parents that yes, they mean it: who your kid is every day of the week is important. Your kid is more than a test score or their grades. Your kid is also more than the name of the college he or she will attend."

"The true way to relieve the crushing pressure of college admissions has been within our power all along: we must do the work on ourselves as parents and to follow our kids’ leads while we gently guide and support them – not to get them into a good college, but to get them to be good people." But as I often say, "it's more important to raise a good person than a good student."  (To read the full article please visit: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/parenting/wp/2016/04/05/want-your-child-to-get-into-college-and-have-a-good-life-heres-how/ )

Here at Linder Educational Coaching we work with your child to help your them learn organization and time management. For most students, they have to learn a system that works for the way they think and operate daily. Our coaches have experience organizing a variety of students with different techniques. Let us help your child get control of their academic life and help prepare them for life, not just their college acceptance. To set up an appointment or learn more, please visit: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/


Monday, April 4, 2016

When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges

Good morning!

Today we are sharing another article from http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift entitled 'When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges.' This article talks about how when kids are provided with the correct structure enabling them to learn how they are learning (or not learning/comprehending), it teaches them the essential skills and understanding they need to become life-long learners.

"Helping students to “learn how to learn” or in Ritchhart’s terminology, become “meta-strategic thinkers” is crucial for understanding and becoming a life-long learner. To discover how aware students are of their thinking at different ages, Ritchhart has been working with schools to build “cultures of thinking.” His theory is that if educators can make thinking more visible, and help students develop routines around thinking, then their thinking about everything will deepen." To view the entire article visit: http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2016/03/31/when-kids-have-structure-for-thinking-better-learning-emerges/

Here at Linder Educational Coaching we work with students of all ages to provide them with the skills they need to be able to recognize their own learning patterns and help them achieve greater awareness of their thinking.

"Research shows that when fourth graders are asked to develop a concept map about thinking, most of their brainstorming centers around what they think and where they think it. “When students don’t have strategies about thinking, that’s how they respond – what they think and where they think,” Richhart said. Many fifth graders start to include broad categories of thinking on their concept maps like “problem solving” or “understanding.” Those things are associated with thinking, but fifth graders often haven’t quite hit on the process of thinking.

By sixth grade a few students are starting to include some strategies for thinking in their maps, such as “concentrate” or “don’t get caught up in things that aren’t relevant.” But by ninth grade many students include specific strategies for thinking on their concept maps, including “making connections,” “comparing” and “breaking things down.”

If you are looking to help your child become a better learner and enable them to recognize their distinct patterns of learning, contact us today! Very rarely do teachers in school have the time or ability to focus on one student and understand the struggles and problems with that student’s learning method. Sadly, there is no required class in study skills for school and, even if there was, there is no system that works for everyone. Each person learns differently and needs to find a way to use his/her natural abilities in school.

With private coaching here at Linder, we work with students intensively, at least a few hours a week at first, to analyze what their current strategies are and how we can improve on them. Visit http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/programs/ to learn more about our services and our private coaching!


Monday, March 28, 2016

Why Listening to Podcasts Helps Improve Kids Reading Skills

Good morning,

Today we are sharing an interesting article written by Mindshift which talks about how one English teacher pushed the Status quo and found that there was a connection between using podcasts as a teaching tool and students wanting to read more as a result.

"Listening to stories does not immediately seem connected to reading, and in fact, readers of MindShift stories about podcasts in the classroom have commented that they don’t offer enough rigor. However, English teacher Michael Godsey discovered that most of his students prefer to listen to a podcast while reading the transcript over listening or reading alone. The combination of audio and text allowed for reading breaks and helped students learning English as a second language connect the text to the sounds." To view the full article, please visit: http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2016/03/18/why-listening-to-podcasts-helps-kids-improve-reading-skills/

Photo courtesy of Mindshift 

Each person learns differently and needs to find a way to use his/her natural abilities in school and that's one of the many things we help students do. Here at Linder Education we employ a variety of teaching tools and methods to help your student improve in and out of the classroom. If you are looking for help for your student, please contact us at: http://www.lindereducationalcoaching.com/